A Travellerspoint blog

2019 Japan: Waste disposal visit and Miyajima Island


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On Miyajima Island

On Miyajima Island

We do not usually visit a garbage plant while on holidays in a foreign country. But this week we did. We visited the Hiroshima City Naka Incineration Plant, built on reclaimed land by the water in Hiroshima.

This is not any old garbage dump, it is waste disposal facility designed by Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi, who was responsible for the redesign of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, among other high profile jobs. It cost US$400 million and is fascinating to see. We were disappointed however that there was not any explanation in English.

Naka Incineration Plant

Naka Incineration Plant


Incineration Plant from the street

Incineration Plant from the street

The architect was aware that such a huge structure down by the waterside could be an eyesore, and a visual barrier, so he decided to extend the main road as a walkway right through the factory to the waterside. There is a huge glass atrium through the centre of the building. We had walked down the long street to the facility, and had noticed a stream of small garbage trucks, much smaller than we have in Australia. These trucks entered underneath the building, unloaded, and headed off again

Little garbage trucks enter below

Little garbage trucks enter below


Like this one on the right

Like this one on the right

As we walk into the Ecorium, we wondered if this facility was even working. There was no smell, and no sound coming through the thick glass walls.

Entrance to Ecorium

Entrance to Ecorium

We could walk right through Ecorium. Around us were glass walls, and behind them all sorts of stainless steel machinery. I read that 400 tons of garbage is processed daily and that energy is produced as a by-product. But what an amazing facility. We had already talked about waste disposal here. Everything we buy is covered in plastic, and I have to be quick to get out my reusable bag before they put the goods in a plastic bag. When we buy sandwiches, salads or yoghurt at the Seven 11 they add chopsticks, napkins, wipes or plastic spoons. Waste bins in hotel rooms don't usually have sections like many countries do. It makes this wonderful facility such a surprise...

In we go

In we go


Sections of the plant

Sections of the plant


We see this through the glass wall

We see this through the glass wall

Right through toward the other side

Right through toward the other side


Overlooking the water

Overlooking the water

Then to Miyajima Island, just a another short train trip away. The island is actually called Itsukushima, but is more commonly referred to as Miyajima which is Japanese for 'shrine island'. It is most famous for its giant Torii gate, which at high tide seems to float on the water, but also for its scenery, hiking trails, onsens and seafood. We knew we would not be seeing the famous floating Torii Gate as I had read it is currently covered by scaffolding
.
Boarding the ferry to Miyajima Island

Boarding the ferry to Miyajima Island


Oyster beds on the way

Oyster beds on the way


The Great Torii Gate covered with scaffolding

The Great Torii Gate covered with scaffolding


This what it should look like

This what it should look like


Arriving at the island

Arriving at the island


Welcome party

Welcome party


After anything he has to offer

After anything he has to offer


Lovely spot

Lovely spot

There were so many places selling food. Lots of oysters and conger eel.

These were delicious

These were delicious


Think of Tasmanian scallop pies..

Think of Tasmanian scallop pies..

It is a very pretty place. No beachside palm trees but cypress and lanterns.

Chatting

Chatting


Maple leaf Hiroshima symbol

Maple leaf Hiroshima symbol


And their own beer

And their own beer


Seaside Torii Gate

Seaside Torii Gate


Lantern along the beach

Lantern along the beach

Closer to the Itsukushima Floating Torii Gate (Temporarily under Construction)

Closer to the Itsukushima Floating Torii Gate (Temporarily under Construction)

We walked uphill to a couple of shrines. Lovely walking tracks all with those cypress trees I love.

Five story Pagoda

Five story Pagoda


Toyokuni Shrine up the hill

Toyokuni Shrine up the hill


Coffee ice-cream, couldn't pass that by

Coffee ice-cream, couldn't pass that by


Traditional houses

Traditional houses

Walking back past all the food shops was great. Many new dishes to see. Our curried oyster bun and icecream had been enough, but there were many foods I would have liked to try.

There were lots of Conger Eel dishes here

There were lots of Conger Eel dishes here


Even in Steamed Buns

Even in Steamed Buns


Here they are

Here they are


Eel dish

Eel dish


Also lots of oysters

Also lots of oysters


Oysters

Oysters


The air was full of the smell of oysters being grilled

The air was full of the smell of oysters being grilled


Haven't heard of this one

Haven't heard of this one


Well, that's a totally new snack

Well, that's a totally new snack


Small shrine

Small shrine


No chicken nugget meals here for children

No chicken nugget meals here for children


Beautiful tree

Beautiful tree


For some reason they are removing the pine cones

For some reason they are removing the pine cones


Bob waiting while I take a picture

Bob waiting while I take a picture

The island was a very relaxing place, lovely after the city.

Here comes the boat back

Here comes the boat back


Back to shore

Back to shore


Tram back near our hotel

Tram back near our hotel

That night we took a wander around the back streets near our hotel. The back streets have small eating houses, and we found one for an early dinner. We liked Hiroshima as a city. And what a history.

Omiya Shrine at night

Omiya Shrine at night


Sake bottle in our chosen dinner place

Sake bottle in our chosen dinner place

Posted by jannettek 17:48 Archived in Japan Comments (0)

2019 Japan: Hiroshima and the Peace Memorial Park


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Famous image of the this relic

Famous image of the this relic

Say the word 'Hiroshima' and it brings forth images of the horrors of the first atomic bomb drop. From 6 August 1945 this city forever became known for suffering this disaster. The bomb obliterated nearly everything within a two kilometre radius. It was thought as well that the city would become uninhabitable, but this wasn't the case. As well as the area being rebuilt with housing etc, historical monuments were gradually rebuilt and a large Peace Park was born.

Neighborhood where the first A-bomb hit

Neighborhood where the first A-bomb hit

There it is - the reality of that famous image of the ruins of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall. This building was designed by a Czech architect and completed in 1915. The building's style was new to Hiroshima, and it became the pride of the city. The demise of the building was small compared to the loss of life and the long term injuries caused by the bomb. The exact number of deaths from the atomic bombing is still unknown. Estimates place the number of dead by the end of December 1945, when the acute effects of radiation poisoning had largely subsided, at roughly 140,000.

Skeletal remains of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotions Hall

Skeletal remains of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotions Hall


Motoyasu-bashi bridge

Motoyasu-bashi bridge


Heading into the park

Heading into the park


A survivor's display

A survivor's display

This display made me wonder how some people who were in the immediate area of the blast managed to survive. This interesting article 'How-long-did-harmful-radiation-remain-in-Hiroshima-and-Nagasaki' explains just how short some of the radiation effects were. I still don't understand why people in the zone had such varying effects from the radiation, which led me to thinking about the television series 'Chernobyl' which we watched quite recently. I wondered how this compared re radioactivity. Wikipedia says '...it has been approximated that about four hundred times more radioactive material was released from Chernobyl than by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.' But how about this, also from Wikipedia ' By contrast the Chernobyl accident released about one hundredth to one thousandth of the total amount of radioactivity released during the era of nuclear weapons testing at the height of the Cold War, 1950–1960s..' Wow...

His story

His story


The ruins of the Promotions Hall among the new modern buildings

The ruins of the Promotions Hall among the new modern buildings

We came next to the Atomic Bomb Memorial Mound, under which is buried a vault which contains the ashes of about 70,000 victims. These were just the persons whose ashes were unclaimed because the entire family had perished or because they were persons of unknown identity.

Atomic Bomb Memorial Mound

Atomic Bomb Memorial Mound

Each year on 6 August an ecumenical memorial service is held by the mound. Sometimes also on the sixth day of other months, as happened the day we were there.

Ceremony near mound

Ceremony near mound

The bomb that dropped didn't only kill Japanese citizens. At this time Japan occupied the Korean Peninsula and had conscripted by force many Koreans to work in Japan. It is thought that 20,000 or more people of Korean lineage died in the bombing. There were feelings from Koreans that these conscripts were not supported after the disaster.

Monument Dedicated to Korean Victims and Survivors

Monument Dedicated to Korean Victims and Survivors

There were also many conscripted students who became victims. In 1944 the government, in an effort to deal with labour shortage, had enacted the Student Labor Service Act. This act required students to perform labour service in munitions factories etc. At the time of the bombing, students were working on demolition of buildings to build fire breaks for air-raids. 6300 students died on the day of the bombing.

Memorial Tower to the Mobilized Students

Memorial Tower to the Mobilized Students

Another monument is Children's Peace Monument, dedicated to Sadako Sasaki, who was exposed to the atomic bombing when she was 2 years old and became well-known after her novelized version of her life 'Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes' was published.

Children's Peace Monument

Children's Peace Monument


Children's Peace Monument

Children's Peace Monument

The Memorial Cenotaph and Peace Flame lie in the centre of the park. The cenotaph's shape represents a shelter for the souls of the victims of the bomb. Inside the the monument is a stone chest that contains a listing of all the people who died as a result of the atomic bomb tragedy.

Memorial Cenotaph and Peace Flame

Memorial Cenotaph and Peace Flame


The dome shape of the Hiroshima Peace Bell was intended to represent the universe

The dome shape of the Hiroshima Peace Bell was intended to represent the universe

And then into the Museum. Very sobering when the graphic reality was before us.

View from the museum

View from the museum


Before the bomb

Before the bomb


After the bomb

After the bomb


From an observer

From an observer


Devastation

Devastation

The theme of peace is very strong throughout the park and the museum. A world without war and nuclear arms is the aim. But these two graphics towards the last displays in the museum make you wonder...

How it started

How it started

Sobering

Sobering

A walk through the park was necessary to come to terms with what we had seen.

Back in the park

Back in the park

Leaving the park, it was time for lunch.

Lunch of Soba Noodles- Bob had cold noodles

Lunch of Soba Noodles- Bob had cold noodles


My hot Soba Noodles

My hot Soba Noodles


And on a lighter note, in the loo, to mask any unwanted sound, I could if I wished turn on a flushing sound

And on a lighter note, in the loo, to mask any unwanted sound, I could if I wished turn on a flushing sound

Out on the street again - this is a very common car shape here

Out on the street again - this is a very common car shape here


We passed this building called the 'carp' building, as the screens look like fish scales

We passed this building called the 'carp' building, as the screens look like fish scales

Hiroshima Castle was next on the agenda. The castle keep was destroyed by the bomb, but was rebuilt in 1958.

Arriving at Hiroshima Castle

Arriving at Hiroshima Castle


The gate at Hiroshima Castle

The gate at Hiroshima Castle


Sailing in the moat

Sailing in the moat

Plenty of fish in the moat

Plenty of fish in the moat


Hiroshima castle

Hiroshima castle

And then the Shukkeien Garden. A garden is always the highlight of the day for me, and this one was superb.

Shukkeien Garden

Shukkeien Garden


Looking acrosss Shukkeien Garden

Looking acrosss Shukkeien Garden


Takuei Pond

Takuei Pond


Peaceful scene

Peaceful scene


Yuyu-tei, Arbour of Leisure

Yuyu-tei, Arbour of Leisure


Thick thatch of Japanese Pampas grass

Thick thatch of Japanese Pampas grass


Koko-kyo Bridge on the lake

Koko-kyo Bridge on the lake


Not everyone wants to walk on the steep Koko-kyo Bridge

Not everyone wants to walk on the steep Koko-kyo Bridge


A tea garden

A tea garden


And a bamboo grove

And a bamboo grove


Picture perfect

Picture perfect

It was a day to think about the world, about the sad, and about the beautiful. And to hope for the peace that is promoted.

Posted by jannettek 01:00 Archived in Japan Comments (0)

2019 Japan: Himeji on the way to Hiroshima


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Stunning Himeji

Stunning Himeji

Our next stop was Hiroshima, but on the way we stopped to check out Himeji Castle. Himeji was an hour and a quarter from Osaka, so we stored our luggage in lockers and headed to the castle only a kilometre away. Himeji looked a very pleasant town, and the straight avenue to the castle was lined with trees and a number of statues, once again, mainly of women.

Walking from the rail station at Himeji

Walking from the rail station at Himeji


Sitting area beside the road

Sitting area beside the road


It is a lovely avenue to the Castle

It is a lovely avenue to the Castle


Sculptures beside the road

Sculptures beside the road


Decorative street manhole cover

Decorative street manhole cover


Boat by Sakuramon Bridge

Boat by Sakuramon Bridge

We had seen a number of castles here, and quite a few temples, and many of them have a history of fire or damage by attack. Or earthquake I remember. Himeji has never suffered these disasters, and so although it has recently been extensively renovated, it is still the original 400 hundred year old building. Though the castle is actually made up of over eighty buildings. They are spread across multiple baileys, which are connected by a series of gates and winding paths.

We entered via the Otemon Gate to the third bailey. Here was a good spot to photograph the castle.

Three roofed Oteman  (Main Gate)

Three roofed Oteman (Main Gate)


Massive hinge on the gate

Massive hinge on the gate


By the castle

By the castle

Then through the Hishi Gate into a labyrinth of paths and gates and baileys. These complicated pathways had a purpose to slow down invaders.

Hishi Gate

Hishi Gate

Complex structure

Complex structure

Then to the main keep and the beautiful a six story wooden structure of Himeji Castle. It is gorgeous, with wing shaped buildings that really make it look as though it might take flight.

Another gate

Another gate


Into the keep

Into the keep


Himeji Castle

Himeji Castle

Once in the castle we had to climb via narrow steep stairs each level up to the sixth floor. The floors are unfurnished and there is very little English signage so we had to use our imagination a bit.

Six floors to climb

Six floors to climb

On the sixth floor we could look out on a view of castle grounds and the town.

The view below

The view below


Leaving the castle

Leaving the castle

Next door to the castle was the Kokoen Garden. This is a relatively recently constructed Japanese style garden, only opened in 1992. There are nine separate, walled gardens designed in various styles of the Edo Period. Among the gardens are the garden of the lord's residence which features a pond with a waterfall, a tea garden where visitors can enjoy green tea in a tea ceremony house, a pine tree garden, a bamboo garden and a flower garden.

The garden next to the castle

The garden next to the castle

In we go

In we go


Pavilion by a pond

Pavilion by a pond


Lovely cypress

Lovely cypress

The bamboo garden

The bamboo garden


Calm and cool by the pool

Calm and cool by the pool

Little waterfall

Little waterfall

Autumn leaves

Autumn leaves

This rock pool is lovey

This rock pool is lovey

Then back to the station to catch another train to Hiroshima, a walk to our hotel, and then to thinking it was time for lunch - 3.30pm by now. So I popped down to the Seven 11 next door and came back with sushi and coffee. Just what we needed.

Lunch

Lunch


About A$4.50 - a good deal

About A$4.50 - a good deal

We put our feet up until it was time for dinner and then went in search of a local dish. And we found it - Hiroshima Okonomyaki. This was cooked differently to the versions we are familiar with. The ingredients were layered, not mixed, which gave the pancake a less floury or gluggy texture.

Hiroshima eat street at night

Hiroshima eat street at night


Hiroshima Okonomiyaki starts off with a thin pancake and then lots of cabbage

Hiroshima Okonomiyaki starts off with a thin pancake and then lots of cabbage

An egg was added, some minced meat, shallots, noodles and and bean sprouts. Then with sauce on top it was delicious.

Cooking down the cabbage

Cooking down the cabbage


Finished pancake

Finished pancake

It had been a big day, and the next day was to be a more sombre one visiting the Peace Memorial Park, so home to bed.

Lots of signs but none we can read

Lots of signs but none we can read


Cake shop window

Cake shop window


More cake

More cake

Posted by jannettek 04:24 Archived in Japan Comments (0)

2019 Japan: Sky high, and the bright lights of Osaka


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The bright lights of Dotonbori

The bright lights of Dotonbori

We started the day up high in the 'Floating Garden' of the Umeda Sky Building. This building consists of twin towers that are connected to each other by a "Floating Garden Observatory" on the 39th floor. This observatory, accessible after paying an entrance fee, doesn't 'float' and doesn't have a garden, but nevertheless is a marvellous piece of architecture and has great views over Osaka.

Umeda Sky Building

Umeda Sky Building


First view out from inside

First view out from inside


After many floors then the glass escalator

After many floors then the glass escalator


Through the window

Through the window

The observation platform of the observatory, a doughnut shape that provides an unobstructed 360-degree view, was built on the ground and was lifted into place by cables and winches. It took 7 hours to lift the 1040 ton piece of engineering. This structural system has excellent resistance to earthquakes. Very clever.

Viewing deck

Viewing deck


Circular shape

Circular shape


There I am in the middle

There I am in the middle

Out to the port

Out to the port

Wonderful view

Wonderful view


Over the river where we are staying

Over the river where we are staying

As we came down I noticed the garden on top of the building next door. Wonderful use of space.

Expansive green area on building

Expansive green area on building

And then this very neat place where those so inclined can attach a lock. Attaching a padlock to a bridge is a custom that has become common in some places, like bridges in Paris. The lock represents a couple's love, and it will stay there for all of eternity. It has become quite a problem in some areas worldwide. None of that pesky having locks in unwanted places here. There are neat lines to add your lock, and even a little stand to put your phone on for a selfie...

Organising those untidy lockers

Organising those untidy lockers


So tidy and Japanese

So tidy and Japanese

Around the Umeda buildings are gardens and a large green wall. They do love plants here...

Vegetable garden below even has rice growing

Vegetable garden below even has rice growing


And the biggest green wall I have seen

And the biggest green wall I have seen

Even the railway station has a display. Osaka seems quite modern, lots of high rise. It is Japan's 3rd largest city. I wondered what was second largest - Yokohama it seems...

Display in the railway station

Display in the railway station


Have no idea...

Have no idea...


Odd one out

Odd one out


Down a sidestreet

Down a sidestreet


Into a shopping arcade

Into a shopping arcade

That evening we went to the Dotonbori area. The name refers both to Dotonbori street and the Dotobori Canal. Here are lights and advertising signs, eating places and nightclubs. Basically a very famous entertainment area. The name came from a merchant named Yasui Doton, who in 1612 had a plan to link the local canals by a new waterway. War came, and he was killed, but his family completed the work and the new canal was named after him.

Dotonbori area

Dotonbori area


We have arrived

We have arrived


Dotonbori Canal

Dotonbori Canal


Street bookshop display

Street bookshop display

Nightclub

Nightclub


Eating a tall one would be a race against time

Eating a tall one would be a race against time


Another Statue of Liberty

Another Statue of Liberty


Halloween decorations again

Halloween decorations again


Fancy light poles

Fancy light poles

We were just about to cross the street when a number of Mario Street Go Karts whizzed by. We had seen these racing around the streets in Tokyo. The people driving them are usually in costume, and follow a leader on a set route past historical sites, tourist spots, and downtown areas. In Tokyo they even go through the very busy Shibuya Crossing! It seems surprising to me that this would be allowed in this country of rules. On the advertising it says 'feel like a celebrity as tourists whip out their cameras to snap photos as you drive by'. Well, that what I did so I hope I made someones day.

You are just walking down the street..

You are just walking down the street..


..and these whizz by

..and these whizz by

Then we passed the famous Glico running man. This is one of the most well known landmarks in Osaka. The sign has been here for 80 years and advertises Glico, the manufacturer of one of Asia’s most famous confectionery companies.

Glico running man

Glico running man


Popular beer

Popular beer


Crowds

Crowds


Can't miss this one

Can't miss this one


Walking..

Walking..


Lights coming on

Lights coming on

As darkness fell the crowds began to grow. It is fun to see so much activity around us. Bit different to Brisbane, but then once every now and again is enough for a place like this. Time to go back to our hotel.

Dotonbori Street and Canal

Dotonbori Street and Canal


By the canal

By the canal


Crowds and lights

Crowds and lights

Eating places galore

Eating places galore


Waiting

Waiting


There are a lot of crab restaurants. We haven't tried any

There are a lot of crab restaurants. We haven't tried any


]Also a lot of octopus eating places

Also a lot of octopus eating places

Leaving to go home

Leaving to go home

Posted by jannettek 04:42 Archived in Japan Comments (0)

2019 Japan: Day trip to Kobe


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Our Teppanyaki chef adding fresh oil

Our Teppanyaki chef adding fresh oil

From Osaka by train to Kobe was only a half hour or so. I had planned for us to stay here but accommodation was better priced in Osaka.

Just behind the station, at the foot of the Mt Rokko range, are three waterfalls and a number of walking tracks to reach them. We only walked to the first fall. After two weeks of walking miles every day, another uphill hike sometimes seems a bridge too far...

Right behind Kobe Train Station

Right behind Kobe Train Station

We did go up the Ropeway (Cable car) to the Kobe Nunobiki Herb Gardens. The garden is only around 25 years old and has 12 themed garden areas. As we travelled up the ropeway we could see the various areas, and had a better view as we walked downhill from the garden centre and restaurant area at the top of the hill. But first we had to admire the view from the top across the city and down to the port area.

On the ropeway

On the ropeway


Looking down - hammocks on the lawn

Looking down - hammocks on the lawn


At the Herb Garden

At the Herb Garden


View of the port from the herb garden

View of the port from the herb garden


Path down the hill past different themed gardens

Path down the hill past different themed gardens


Rose garden

Rose garden


What flower is that..

What flower is that..


Pink field

Pink field

Very pretty

Very pretty

Kitchen garden

Kitchen garden


That looks like a nice job

That looks like a nice job


Places to relax

Places to relax


While above us more travellers arrive

While above us more travellers arrive


Here are the hammocks we saw from above..with a view

Here are the hammocks we saw from above..with a view

Back on the street, we headed towards the Kitano-cho district. This area has a number of western-style residences which were built after Kobe was opened as a Treaty Port in 1869. After that time a Chinatown was established by Chinese immigrants and then a settlement for westerners. Originally there were over 1,000 Western style houses here but now only about 30 remain. Many of these houses are open to the public.

Italian House in Kitano, now an arts museum

Italian House in Kitano, now an arts museum


Foreigners House Kitano

Foreigners House Kitano


Weathercock House, Kitano

Weathercock House, Kitano

The weathercock house was built by a German merchant and is the only one of these houses made of bricks. And of course there there is a weathercock on the top.

Walking towards Weathercock House

Walking towards Weathercock House

The house of Moegi was built as a residence of the Consul-General of the United States in 1903.

Selfies at Moegi House

Selfies at Moegi House


Not your usual apartment block here

Not your usual apartment block here


Nice - most apartment blocks are very plain

Nice - most apartment blocks are very plain


Decorative manhole covers

Decorative manhole covers


Up to Kitano Tenman Shrine

Up to Kitano Tenman Shrine

Then it was lunch time. Today we were more extravagant than usual and had Kobe beef cooked by a Teppanyaki chef. We had not done this before so it was a lovely experience.

Into the Kobe Beef Restaurant

Into the Kobe Beef Restaurant


Past this bigger table to the small room

Past this bigger table to the small room

The larger table a was soon filled with a number of Scottish Rugby supporters and they had a loud and enjoyable time. I am stunned at how many people can be here for weeks to watch rugby.

Stainless steel plate is spotless

Stainless steel plate is spotless

While the chef waited for the plate to heat, we were served some starters.

A small dish of very tender beef, a salad and condiments were placed before us

A small dish of very tender beef, a salad and condiments were placed before us


Then oil and a large pile of sliced garlic is placed on the grill

Then oil and a large pile of sliced garlic is placed on the grill

I couldn't believe how much sliced garlic the chef put on the plate. He let them come to a sizzle and then gently moved individual pieces around. When they were brown he moved them to the side.

The beef and vegetables arrive

The beef and vegetables arrive

Garlic almost like crisps

Garlic almost like crisps

And he now has garlic oil as well

And he now has garlic oil as well

He scooped up the garlic oil (some of which he used later), and then he put the mushroom and daikon onto the plate. In between different tasks on the grill he wiped down the grill plate with a rolled towel and some elbow grease. It looked like new.

Our Teppanyaki chef adding fresh oil

Our Teppanyaki chef adding fresh oil


The mushrooms and daikon are put on the plate

The mushrooms and daikon are put on the plate


The beef is added

The beef is added


All is cooked so carefully, each piece of meat turned to brown evenly on each side.

All is cooked so carefully, each piece of meat turned to brown evenly on each side.


On the plate

On the plate

At this stage accompaniments arrived.

Rice, miso soup and pickles were brought

Rice, miso soup and pickles were brought


And a large pile of beansprouts are cooked

And a large pile of beansprouts are cooked

We thought it was all over and then the tea and icecream arrived..

Tea and icecream to finish

Tea and icecream to finish

Once outside we saw that the weather had got a bit more damp. There was a big match on there that day, so wondered how that would go. Maybe the stadium was covered.

Outside there was drizzling rain

Outside there was drizzling rain

Lovely in the park

Lovely in the park


A  lot of statues of females here

A lot of statues of females here


Another one

Another one


An enclosure for smokers in the middle of the park

An enclosure for smokers in the middle of the park

Our next destination was the Earthquake Memorial Park down on the waterfront. Here there were lots of rugby people about.

Modern buildings

Modern buildings


Freeways above us

Freeways above us

Looks like a ship

Looks like a ship

From a distance I wondered what this artwork was. It looked see-through and light. Coming closer we saw it was a fish - a carp..It was designed by the American Frank Gehry. Close up we could see it is actually made of chain wire, and very sturdy.

What is that..

What is that..


'Fish dance'

'Fish dance'


Made from chain wire

Made from chain wire

Disappointing that we could not see the Earthquake Memorial Park because of the Rugby match closures. But we did see the Kobe Port Tower.

Kobe Port Tower

Kobe Port Tower

Then back towards the train station.

Beef is king here

Beef is king here


Another beef restaurant

Another beef restaurant


Chinatown in Kobe

Chinatown in Kobe

It was a great day. We especially enjoyed lunch. Then just a train or two back to Osaka and another day was done.

Walking to the train

Walking to the train

Posted by jannettek 04:24 Archived in Japan Comments (0)

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